Saturday 20 October 2018 ,
Latest News
  • Bangladeshi national gunned down by ‘BSF’ in Thakurgaon
  • 60 killed after train runs over crowd in India
  • Saudi confirms death of Jamal Khashoggi
  • PM returns home from Saudi Arabia
  • Election schedule in first week of Nov: EC
  • UNSC to meet next week on Myanmar atrocities
  • People pay last tributes to Ayub Bachchu
  • Govt embarks upon crackdown on social media, says HRW
  • Projects to make quake-tolerant buildings elude engineers
18 September, 2018 10:43:29 AM

Print

A year after the Rohingyas were forced out of home

During its next session the Human Rights Council (HRC) is also likely to consider adopting a Resolution on the human rights situation in Myanmar
Prof. Sarwar Md. Saifullah Khaled
A year after the Rohingyas were forced out of home

A year back in Myanmar's Rakhine state insurgents armed mostly with makeshift weapons allegedly attacked a series of police posts. Allegedly they killed a dozen security personnel at the time.

The Myanmar army in response led a pogrom against the Rohingyas – a stateless downtrodden Muslim minority in whose name the insurgents had launched the attacks. To escape the violence more than 700,000 affected Rohingyas fled to nearby Muslim dominated Bangladesh. Since the Myanmar authorities have restricted access to the affected area, the scale of the atrocities perpetrated against the Rohingyas in particular and humanity at large has been hard to confirm. But, however, the United Nations’ (UN) Human Rights Council published an authoritative report, which shows that the abuses were, if anything, worse than has been suspected. The report argues that the received wisdom that the army's rampage claimed 10,000 lives is supposedly an underestimate.
The report, most damningly, says there is evidence that the violence was premeditated. It points out that for years the Myanmar army has abetted the persecution of Rohingyas.
The Myanmar authorities termed the Rohingyas who lived there for generations together as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. It deployed lots of extra troops to Rakhine shortly before the violence erupted there. The army chef Min Aung Hlaing stated baldly that, as the abuses escalated, his troops were solving the "Bangali problem" once and for all. The report concludes that Min and other senior generals should be tried for genocide. But that will not be easy. The army does not admit that much bloodshed took place. And they claim that they have punished only seven soldiers involved in one especially well documented massacre. The civilian government that anyway largely takes the army's side has no authority over military discipline. The UN Security Council could refer Myanmar to the International Criminal Court (ICC). But it is not easy as two of its veto-wielding members, China and Russia also defend the army's conduct. Yet even if they agreed to a referral, it is far from certain that the generals would end up in the dock.

In the meanwhile, Myanmar's government said on 7 August 2018 it "resolutely rejects" a ruling from the International Criminal Court (ICC). In response ICC said that the body has jurisdiction over alleged deportations of Rohingya to Bangladesh as a possible crime against humanity. Myanmar's President Win Myint’s office in a statement dismissed ICC ruling as the result of faulty procedure and is of dubious legal merit. It claimed the allegations, furthermore, consisting of charged narratives of harrowing personal tragedies which have nothing to do with the legal arguments in question were permitted. The statement thereby puts emotional pressure on the Court. Although the prosecutor Fatou Bensouda has not done so yet, the decision from the Hague-based court opened the way for her to further examine whether there is sufficient evidence to file charges against any Myanmar officials.

An independent UN fact-finding mission in August 2018 concluded that Myanmar's military last year 2017 carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Muslim Rohingyas in Rahkine State. This was done with "genocidal intent" and the commander-in-chief and five generals should be prosecuted for orchestrating the gravest crimes under law. As per UN agencies, about 700,000 Rohingya fled the crackdown. And most of those are now living in refugee camps in Bangladesh. The cross-border nature of deportation was sufficient for jurisdiction although Myanmar is not a member of the Hague-based court, but Bangladesh is. Claiming Myanmar’s military carried out justifiable actions against militants, it has denied allegations of atrocities made against its security forces by the refugees. Myanmar the Southeast Asian nation in its statement, repeated its position that, it is not a party to the Rome Statute that set up the ICC. As a result it was under no obligation to respect ICC rulings.

The Rohingya repatriation process is being delayed because of the absence of political will on the part of Myanmar and its de facto leader Suu Kyi's refusal to recognise reality of the situation.

Forcibly displaced through arson, murder and driven out of their country a year back, these illegal migrants Rohingyas continue to suffer in jam-packed Bangladeshi refugee camps. They are cradling painful reminders of the horror in Myanmar they fled from. The United Nations General Assembly, as expected, will start their 73rd session in New York from the third week of September 2018. The UN Generla assembly is likely to discuss the Rohingya issue in the Third Committee. Like in 2017 it subsequently will adopt a resolution in December 2018. The UN accuses the Myanmar army of genocide.

During its next session the Human Rights Council (HRC) is also likely to consider adopting a Resolution on the human rights situation in Myanmar.
The fact-finding mission established by HRC is also expected to submit a report. The report should help chart out further action on the question of accountability for the atrocious crimes committed against the Rohingyas by Myanmar military. The world nations are also needed to respond more promptly and effectively in this regard. All Bangladesh’s friends need to understand the gravity of the situation. It is urgent that a speedy resolution of this catastrophe is required to avert instability in the region and possible communal violence.

The writer is a retired Professor of Economics, BCS General

Education Cadre

Comments

Poll
Today's Question »
AL General Secretary Obaidul Quader said Oikya Front has stumbled right at the start as its leaders were knocking on foreigners’ doors instead of going to the people. Do you agree?
 Yes
 No
 No Comment
Yes 72.9%
No 14.8%
No Comment 12.3%
Video
More Opinion Stories
Thousands of newborn babies die annually in Bangladesh A common maxim goes like this: when a parent dies, you lose your past, when a child dies, you lose your future. The crudest reality in the lives of parents is perhaps to see their children die soon after their birth or a few years…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting