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17 October, 2020 07:14:23 PM

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Understanding the journal impact factor

The underlying assumption behind IF is that journals with high IF publish articles cited more frequently than journals with lower IF
Dr. M. Abdul Kaium & Dr. Mohammed Mizanur Rahman
Understanding the journal impact factor

'Indexing' is the first substantial issue, and although selecting a journal for the manuscript, 'Impact Factor' is the subsequent concern. There may only be an Impact Factor (IF)/Cite Score for SSCI / SCI / SCIE and SCOPUS indexing journals.

No other indexing journals can acquire the impact factor.
Numerous studies have been made in which Journal Impact Factors (JIF), as developed by the Institute for Scientific Information (Thomson-ISI), were used as the quantitative means to express the 'quality' of entities.
Impact Factor is an outcome of the Journal Citation Report (JCR), an annual publication by Clarivate Analytics. The JCR provides quantitative apparatuses for ranking, evaluating, categorizing, and comparing journals agreeing with their relative worth.
The underlying assumption behind IF is that journals with high IF publish articles cited more frequently than journals with lower IF. The impact factor can be used to grossly estimate the reputation of journals published by individuals, libraries to settle on choices on assortment development, academic departments to survey scholarly efficiency, and academic departments to make decisions on promotion and tenure.
The impact factor is one of these; it is a measure of the frequency at which the "average article" in a journal has been cited (a published research paper is used as a reference in writing a new manuscript) in a given year or period. The annual JCR impact factor is a ratio between citations and recent published citable items. The impact factor is then determined by dividing the number of current year citations to the source items published in that journal during the past two years.
An impact factor of 1.0 implies that the articles published a year or two earlier were cited once, on average. An Impact Factor of 2.5 means that the articles published a year or two ago were cited on average two and a half times. Citing articles might be from the same journal; most citing articles are from different journals. For instance, the impact factor of the journal for 2019 will be measured as A= total cites in 2019, B= 2019 cites to articles published in 2017-18 (this is a subset of A), C= number of articles published in 2017-18, D = B/C = 2019 impact factor.
There have been several innovative applications of journal impact factors. Market research for publishers and others is among the most popular. The JCR (Journal Citation Report) of Web of Science (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4) offers a technique for librarians and researchers to deal with assortments of library papers. In market research, the impact factor provides editors and publishers with quantitative proof to place their journals in a vertical comparison rather than in a horizontal or intra-disciplinary examination comparable to rivalry, particularly in a similar subject classification.
Compared to business and social science journals, nearly the best science journals have a high impact factor. In light of the Journal Impact Factor, research organizations and academic bodies rank the SSCI/SCI journals, for instance, ABDC (Australian Business Deans Council) Journal Ranking: Categorize the SSCI/SCI journals in A*, A, B, C. Other bodies, such as the Association of Business Schools (ABS) Academic Journal Quality Guide, AERES (France), BFI (Denmark), CNRS (France), ESSEC Rankings of Journals 2016 (France), FNEGE (France), Jour QUAL 2.1 (Germany), NSD (Norway), Polish Scholarly Bibliography (PBN), QUALIS (Brazil), and so forth.
SCOPUS indexing journals, then again, often have an IF known as 'Cite Score.' Cite Score determines the average citations received by the corresponding manuscript published in a Journal. The Cite Score values depend on citation counts in a given year (e.g., 2019) to documents published in three past schedule years (e.g., 2016-18), divided by the number of documents in these three previous years (e.g., 2016-18). Scimago of Scopus (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4) represents the stages of Cite Score assigned in Scopus. The impact factor of SSCI/SCI/SCIE journals carries more values than SCOPUS 'Cite Score' Journals in the research and academic world.


Dr. M. Abdul Kaium teaches at University of Barishal, [email protected] & Dr. Mohammed Mizanur Rahman teaches at Comilla University, [email protected]

 

 

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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