Sunday 25 August 2019 ,
Latest News
All parties should use portrait of Bangabandhu | Child among two die of dengue | Pressure should be squarely on Myanmar: US | Top Saudi port builder to develop maritime sector in Bangladesh | Hundreds of new fires in Brazil as outrage over Amazon grows |
22 July, 2019 00:00 00 AM

Print

Iceland tops Europe as most expensive

AFP, Reykjavik

The hot springs of Iceland are not the only thing making tourists sweat, as a look at the hotel or lunch bill will tell you that most things cost more, sometimes much more, than anywhere else in Europe.

On the subarctic island, consumer prices were on average 56 per cent higher than the rest of Europe in 2018, making Iceland the single most expensive country, ahead of Switzerland (52 per cent), Norway (48 per cent) and Denmark (38 per cent), according to Eurostat data.

In order to avoid unpleasant surprises, a tourist, Quint Johnson, said he had done "some research," before travelling to Iceland from the United States for a week's vacation with his family.

"But it's been a little bit of a shock," the 22-year-old student told AFP, having discovered the chilling rates for familiar items like a simple hamburger with fries and a beer.

A glance at the menu at an Icelandic restaurant will tell you that a plain cheese pizza will run you around 2,400 kronur -- around 17 euros ($19) -- a glass of wine will be the equivalent of at least 10 euros ($11) and a pint of beer costs about seven euros ($8).

"That's a big price jump compared to what I'm used to," Johnson said. "I can get a burger and fries and beer at home for probably $12-$13 and here we're more like $20 if not $25."

According to the consumer price comparison site Numbeo, a dinner for two in an average restaurant comes to about 85 euros, a bottle of wine in a shop is priced at around 17 euros, and a dozen eggs cost up to five euros.

A small population of 355,000 coupled with a high dependence on imported goods and high taxes on alcohol all help explain Iceland's steep prices.

"Iceland is so small.

So it's very difficult to get the same economies of scale as you have with companies in countries that are 100 times larger," said Konrad Gudjonsson, chief economist at the Iceland Chamber of Commerce.

 

Comments

Poll
Today's Question »
State minister for power Nasrul Hamid yesterday said everyone to have access to electricity by June. Do you think the feat achievable by the timeframe?
 Yes
 No
 No Comment
Yes 47.3%
No 48.7%
No Comment 4.1%
Most Viewed
E-Paper

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting