Sunday 17 November 2019 ,
Latest News
Gas cylinder blast kills 5 of a family in Chattogram | Dhaka needs to utilise growing global pressure on Myanmar: Experts | Rotten onions in canal while price skyrockets | PM slams lavish life with ill-gotten money | PM reaches Dubai to join Air Show |
15 October, 2019 00:00 00 AM

Print

‘Kashphul’ brings money for farmers

AHMED NASIM ANSARY, JHENIDAH
‘Kashphul’ brings money for farmers
Kashphul, a flower that heralds autumn in Bangladesh, has the potential of becoming a cash crop for farmers in the district. The wild variety of this fibre-like flower has been an important way of earning for farmers in Kaliganj upapzila. The farmers have been showing eagerness to cultivate the flower as it ensures more profit than paddy, wheat, jute or other crops. After visiting some villages of Kaliganj upapzila, this correspondent came to know that the once-neglected kashphul is being cultivated on a commercial basis at Paikpara, Niamatpur, Baropakhia and surrounding villages. Farmers said they cultivated the flowers on fallow tracts of land in autumn and the dried plants were used as fuel by ultra-poor villagers. Kashphul is also gaining popularity as a material for creating shade in betel leaf orchards. A few years back, some of the betel leaf orchard owners used to purchase this flower at a nominal price, but farmers are now selling them at a higher price. A farmer can earn as much as Tk. 60,000 a year by cultivating kashphuls, while the same plot can hardly ensure Tk. 40,000 from the cultivation of other crops. Also, this flower does not require any weeding, irrigation and maintenance cost throughout the year. The farmers said they faced difficulties as the land where kashphul grew hampered the growth of other crops as the plants have deep-roots. They, however, maintained that the flowers came as a blessing to them due to their increasing demand in the betel leaf orchards over the last few years. When contacted, Anil Das and some betel leaf orchard-owners said the price of the materials used in the orchards had been increasing day by day. But the price of kashphul was comparatively low. Considering the price, they started using the flowers in their orchards to reduce the production cost, they added. Jahidul Karim, upazila agriculture officer (UAO), said: “I am happy when I see farmers earning money by cultivating kashphul. No one advised them in this regard. They found out on their own that the flowers could be used in betel leaf orchards.”

Kashphul, a flower that heralds autumn in Bangladesh, has the potential of becoming a cash crop for farmers in the district.

The wild variety of this fibre-like flower has been an important way of earning for farmers in Kaliganj upapzila. The farmers have been showing eagerness to cultivate the flower as it ensures more profit than paddy, wheat, jute or other crops.

After visiting some villages of Kaliganj upapzila, this correspondent came to know that the once-neglected kashphul is being cultivated on a commercial basis at Paikpara, Niamatpur, Baropakhia and surrounding villages.

Farmers said they cultivated the flowers on fallow tracts of land in autumn and the dried plants were used as fuel by ultra-poor villagers.

Kashphul is also gaining popularity as a material for creating shade in betel leaf orchards. A few years back, some of the betel leaf orchard owners used to purchase this flower at a nominal price, but farmers are now selling them at a higher price. A farmer can earn as much as Tk. 60,000 a year by cultivating kashphuls, while the same plot can hardly ensure Tk. 40,000 from the cultivation of other crops. Also, this flower does not require any weeding, irrigation and maintenance cost throughout the year.

The farmers said they faced difficulties as the land where kashphul grew hampered the growth of other crops as the plants have deep-roots.

They, however, maintained that the flowers came as a blessing to them due to their increasing demand in the betel leaf orchards over the last few years.

When contacted, Anil Das and some betel leaf orchard-owners said the price of the materials used in the orchards had been increasing day by day. But the price of kashphul was comparatively low. Considering the price, they started using the flowers in their orchards to reduce the production cost, they added.

Jahidul Karim, upazila agriculture officer (UAO), said: “I am happy when I see farmers earning money by cultivating kashphul. No one advised them in this regard. They found out on their own that the flowers could be used in betel leaf orchards.”

 

Comments

Poll
Today's Question »
State minister for power Nasrul Hamid yesterday said everyone to have access to electricity by June. Do you think the feat achievable by the timeframe?
 Yes
 No
 No Comment
Yes 47.3%
No 48.7%
No Comment 4.1%
Most Viewed
E-Paper
More Nationwide stories
Sundarbans bears brunt of cyclone Bulbul The cyclone Bulbul that wreaked havoc in the country’s coastal districts in the early hours of 10th November (Sunday) damaged 4,589 trees, including Sundari, in the Sundarbans, the world’s…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting